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pubblicazioni - Presentazione

BESS for Primary Frequency Regulation in Support of Thermal Power Plants

pubblicazioni - Presentazione

BESS for Primary Frequency Regulation in Support of Thermal Power Plants

Si è analizzata, in simulazione, la possibile fornitura del servizio di regolazione primaria di frequenza da parte di un sistema di accumulo basato su batterie, a supporto di un impianto convenzionale a carbone italiano. Si sono in particolare valutati i relativi scambi energetici, la loro valorizzazione economica e la loro incidenza sulla vita utile della batteria.

Thanks to their high response speed and versatility, Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) could, in a “stand-alone” configuration or in support of NPRES plants (where allowed) or Conventional Power Plants (CPP), supply in a very flexible way Ancillary Services (AS) for power system security. Here, a techno-economic analysis is carried out about the possible supply of Primary Frequency Regulation (PFR) by a BESS in support of an Italian 660-MW coal-fired CPP. The BESS response to measured frequency (along a 29-week period in 2015, and with a 100-ms sampling step) is simulated, and analyzed in terms of energy exchanged (in absorption and injection separately), average power exchanged, fractions of time in which power is exchanged or not.

The energy exchanged, for PFR and also for SoC control, is evaluated economically, in the Northern Italy market zone in particular, according to the Italian regulatory framework. Then, considering the BESS investment costs and the annual profit from the PFR service and from SoC control, the Pay-Back Period (PBP) of the BESS investment is evaluated. The PBP is also compared with the BESS cycling life. Three battery technologies are evaluated: lithium-ion, sodium-sulfur and sodium nickel chloride. It turns out that, using only the BESS for the regulation (i.e. without further support by the plant itself) may not be profitable, due to the BESS limited energy capacity, as it happens for the lithium-ion technology, or due to its high investment costs, as in the sodium-sulfur case.

However, further economic analyses have to be carried out, because, although with additional O&M costs, the plant could nonetheless gain economic benefits, i) by selling its whole capacity on the energy market while using the BESS for the PFR service, or ii) by providing more flexible AS (e.g. faster PFR just thanks to the BESS).

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